How Tiger Woods has grip on the golf club and grip on the golf club to meet your needs

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How to grab the golf club like Tiger Woods.

First we need to make some reference points on your hands so that you can easily place your hands in the right position for each grip style that will be described. Although this article will give instructions as if you were a right-handed golfer, if you are a Lefty, use the instruction in the same way just by turning hands (Right instead of Left etc.) An easy way to apply this wave grip fit exercise will be for you to use a marker to draw reference points on your hands and / or a golf glove (s).

Grip reference points

The reference points shown below are abbreviated identifications marked in brackets that will be used to identify them in the remainder of this manual for wave instructions.

Left Hand Attributes

  1. "(AS)" Anatomic snuff box – If you hold your hand in front of you with your fingers pointing away from you and with your palm down, the "snuff box" (actual anatomical name) is on the right side from your wrist to the "base" where the wrist hinges. Keep pointing your fingers away from you and turn your hand counterclockwise, pointing your thumb straight up. Bend your wrist so that your hand moves vertically up and down. Place the tip of the index finger of your right hand on the "top" of your left wrist. While your left hand is bent vertically upwards, you can feel two tendons on your left wrist. Between these two tendons it feels like there is a "pocket", which is "pocket" your "Snuffbox". Draw a small ¼ inch "X" on top of the "pocket".
  2. "(BK)" Points on your big knuckles – Make a fist with your left hand and place the big knuckles at the base of your fingers on the "top" of your fist, with the palm to down, and draw a dot of 1/4 inch on the "top" of each of your first 3 knuckles.
  3. "(BIF)" Point at the base of index finger – Look at your palm and draw a ¼ inch point at the base of your index finger in the middle of the finger on top of the fold or fold into the skin.
  4. "(D)" D on the Callas path at the base of your little finger – Pull with your palm towards you a letter "D" (distance) on top of the Callas at the base of your Pinky- finger.
  5. "(N)" N on the right side of your palm – Visualize a horizontal line in the middle of your palm with your palm pointing towards you and with your fingers pointing straight up. Now draw a letter "N" (short for Neutral) on the right side of your palm on the horizontal line you just visualized. The "N" is just below the "D" you have just highlighted.
  6. "(C)" C on the heel mat – Visualize a vertical line passing through the "D" and "N" that you have just highlighted, pointing you and your fingers straight up. Draw a letter "C" (abbreviation for control) on top of the heel cushion. The letter C should be about 1-1.5 inches below the N that you have marked.
  7. "(TRS)" Line top right thumb – Point your thumb away from you with the thumbnail at the top. Visualize the middle at the top of your thumb, splitting your thumbnail into two equal halves. Concentrate on the "right half", visualize the middle of that half and mark it through the middle by drawing a line from the first to the second knuckles. This is the top right of your thumb.
  8. "(LV)" V between thumb and forefinger – Keep your thumb away from you and your fingers pointing upwards, hold your thumb against your index finger. A "V" is formed between the top of your thumb and forefinger.

Right Hand Marks

  1. "(BP)" Point at the base of your little finger – Look at your palm and draw a dot of ¼ inch at the base of your finger in the middle of the finger on top of the fold or fold in the skin .
  2. "(MIF)" Point on the middle knuckle of the index finger – Look at your palm, draw a ¼ inch point in the middle of your index finger over the middle (2nd) knuckle where the fold is in the skin.
  3. "(LL)" The Lifeline – Mark the lifeline in the palm of your hand, with your palm pointing at you and your fingers. It is the line at the bottom of your thumb pad that runs from the bottom of your palm and between your thumb and forefinger to the top right of your palm.
  4. "(RV)" V between thumb and forefinger – Keep your thumb away from you and your fingers pointing upwards, hold your thumb against your index finger. A "V" is formed between the top of your thumb and forefinger.
  5. "?" and "(RV)" support the golf club – Hold your hand with your fingers straight up, the palm pointing to the left and your thumb towards you. Fold all 4 fingers at the second knuckle. Tilt your index finger to the right so that it leans backwards and notice that your index finger should now look like a question mark (?). Your question mark (?) Shaped forefinger and the "V" shape between your thumb and forefinger (RV) support the golf club at the top of your golf swing.

A few lines

  1. The palms on both hands "Always" face each other – The correct placement of your Right Hand on the handle is determined after first placing the left hand on the handle to ensure the correct positional relationship between both hands. If you put your hands in front of you with your fingers stretched and your thumbs pointing upwards and your hands together with the palms facing each other and then you turn your hands clockwise and counterclockwise, that "relationship" between both hands maximizes your wrists to "squat" and "squat" during the golf swing and maximize the potential for club head speed. Regardless of whether your left hand uses a strong grip or a weak wave grip, your right hand always reflects what your left hand does, so that the palms face each other. An alternative to this rule is given by some instructors. I have seen this butterfly style a butterfly grip. Place your palms in front of you. Let your thumbs together and separate your hands at the bottom until your hands form a right angle or a 90 degree angle. While maintaining the angle of your hands, place the lifeline of your right hand on top of your left thumb. Use this relationship when you move the right hand into & # 39; Step Two: The Right Grip & # 39; places later in this article.
  2. Every thumb and forefinger of the hand are "Always" together and create a "V" as mentioned earlier in the section "Gripference Points".
  3. The right hand "Always" uses a finger grip with the wave shaft over the fingers, always at the same angle.

Grip Variables left

Three Grip Angles

The grip angle is the angle at which the golf takes place shaft runs over the palm and / or fingers of your left hand.

The " Distance " Grip. – This is the one who uses Tiger Woods. Tiger says it gives him the best combination of sensitivity and control.

Advantages

  • Maximizes the ability of the wrist to "cock" and "stool" for maximum club head speed.
  • Good for distance and sensitivity.

Disadvantages

  • Requires more strength and skill to fold the face at once.

A distance grip is achieved by grabbing the wave shaft at an angle that runs from the base of the index finger (BIF) over the base of the fingers to the top of the callus that is at the base of the the finger finger (D). After wrapping the fingers around the billet, most of the grip force will be felt in the fingers with "some" pressure on the bottom of your heel cushion. The thumb is placed against the index finger (LV).

The " Neutral " Grip. – Good grip for most people.

Advantages

  • Gives the most flexibility when it comes to taking pictures.
  • Balance between distance and accuracy.

Disadvantages

  • None.

A neutral grip is achieved by grabbing the wave shaft in the hand at an angle running from the base of the index finger (BIF) over the palm to the (N) mark. Wrap the fingers around the club. The gripping force is felt between the fingers and firmly against the bottom of your heel pad. The thumb is placed against the index finger (LV).

The " Control " Grip.

Advantages

  • Gives maximum control on accuracy.

Disadvantages

  • Minimizes the ability of wrists to "cock" and "non-cock", resulting in less distance.

A control grip is achieved by grabbing the wave shaft in the hand at an angle that runs from the base of the index finger (BIF) over the palm to the (C) mark. Wrap the fingers around the club. The gripping force is felt between the fingers, the palm and the top of the heel cushion. The thumb is placed against the index finger (LV).

Three handle strengths

The "strength" of the handle is determined by the position of your hand on the grip compared to the relative position of the face, while you your hand rotates around the handle to the left or right. The reference point used to determine the correct rotational position of the hand on the handle is the anatomical snuff box (AS). To view the "strength" of the grip with the help of the (AS), position the ball on a golf ball as if it were touching with the face facing the target. Grasp the bat with your left hand and look at the top of your left hand and determine if the (AS) is above the club shaft (neutral) or on the left (weak) or right side of the shaft (strong). The following descriptions will contain how the particular "Power" is described.

The " Weak " Handle.

Advantages

  • Helps to hook up the golf ball.

Disadvantages

  • Very difficult to hit the ball from right to left.

Looking down at the top of your hand, with the face pointing straight towards the target, the anatomical snuff box (AS) has just been removed from the left side of the handle. Your thumb is on top of the club shaft and your "V" (LV) points to your chin and you see 1 – 1.5 knuckles (BK).

The " Neutral " grip. – This is the one who uses Tiger Woods. It is a good grip for most people.

Advantages

  • Ideal grip for hitting the golf ball from left to right or from right to left.

Disadvantages

  • Requires more power to set the club right by impact.

Looking down at the top of your hand, with the face pointing straight towards the target, the anatomical snuff box (AS) is located directly above the top of the handle. Your "V" (LV) points to your right ear and you see 2 – 2.5 knuckles (BK). Tiger Woods sees 2.5 knuckles (BK).

The " Strong " Grip.

Advantages

  • Helps to eliminate the cutting off of the golf ball.
  • Good to get more distance.
  • Good amateur grip because it requires less force to compact the face at impact.

Disadvantages

  • Difficult to get from left to right.

Looking down at the top of your hand, with the face pointing straight towards the target, the anatomical snuff box (AS) is located on the right side of the handle. Your "V" (LV) points to your right shoulder and you see 3 knuckles (BK).

Three unifying grips

These grips describe how to unite and close your hands together so that your hands function as a whole. Note: when you join your hands, do not try to break them together to make them closer, because that loses valuable leverage. Make sure they feel united and snugly fit together

The " 10 finger grip ." – This handle places all 8 fingers on the wave shaft.

Advantages

  • Good leverage.
  • Good alternative for children and women.

Disadvantages

  • Less club head speed, especially if the hands are allowed to spread in the handle and are not comfortable with each other.

A finger grip of 10 is achieved by gripping the wave shaft with all the fingers on the shaft. The outside of your right little finger is pressed against the outside of your left index finger.

The " Overlap Grip ." – This is regarded by many professionals as the preferred method of uniting the hands.

Advantages

  • Good for larger hands

Disadvantages

  • For people with small hands, the right hand have the tendency to slide too far or too far below the club in an effort to feel snug and fitting.

An overlap grip has been achieved by placing all hands on the shaft and lifting the little finger of the right hand from the handle and directing this finger straight out and sliding the right hand to the left hand until the third finger on the right hand well against the dial is placed finger of the left hand. Lay the little finger with the right hand down over the notch between the index finger and the index finger of the left hand.

The " Interlock Grip ." – This is the grip that Tiger Woods likes. Tiger started using it because his idol Jack Nicklaus used it.

Advantages

  • Good for smaller hands

Disadvantages

  • There is a tendency to the club to grab a lot in the palm of the Right Hand.

A locking handle is achieved by placing all hands on the shaft and raising the little finger of the right hand. out of the grip and point straight out with that finger and then slide the right hand towards the left hand until the third finger on the right is placed tightly against the index finger of the left hand. Now bring the index finger of the left hand of the handle and point it straight out and grab the left index finger and the pink finger right by placing the right finger in the cross between the index finger and the second finger of the left hand and laying the left hands index finger down in the cross between the right hands pink finger and third finger.

Preservation of stability during the swing

The correct placement of the left hand grip is obtained by letting out ½ inch of the grip or from the bottom of your hand stabbing. If you hold the club in both hands, you should be able to see ½ inch from the tip of the club shaft's claw in order to ensure that you have the maximum stability of the golf club during the swing. If you do this, you will not lose a distance.

Making a complete grasp

Step one: the left handle

  1. Four the face to the goal line.
  2. Grab the bat ½ inch down from the top of the shaft to the "handle angle" you have chosen; "distance", "neutral" or "control".
  3. The thumb and forefinger are placed together and form the "V" (LV).
  4. While the club head rests on the ground and the face is still square to the target, look at the top of your left hand and turn your left hand around the club, left or left to the right. Left-handed "gripping force" you have chosen using your reference marks to verify the correct position as "weak", "neutral" or "strong".

Step two: The right-hand handle

  1. With the golf club still on the ground in your left hand, the easiest way to visualize how to get the right hand on the wave grip is by grabbing the wave grip just like you shake someone's hand
  2. With the palm of your right hand roughly opposite your palm of your left hand, place the fingers of your right hands on the handle at an angle of the dot at the bottom of your little finger (BP) until the dot in the middle of your index finger (MIF).
  3. Place the Lifeline (LL) on the top right of your left thumb (TRS).
  4. Wrap your fingers around the grip. Hold your thumb and forefinger together and form the "V" (RV) and form the question mark (?) With your index finger. The tip of your thumb and index finger on your right hand touches or almost touches. There will probably be an opening between your index finger and the second finger of your right hand on the handle because you form the question mark (?) With your index finger.

Step three: unite your hands

Unite your hands using one of the "unifying handles & # 39 ;. Your hands should fit comfortably and comfortably together.

Grip Pressure and Feel

The wave grip should be snug and united in your hands, if it is not un-grip and regress and make minor adjustments if necessary. You must maintain a constant, unaltered gripping pressure throughout the golf swing. Grab the club as loosely as possible while you keep control of the golf club during the whole swing.

Regular practice

After you have determined which grip combination you intend to use regularly, practice until it is stored in the memory and use the reference points of the grip to ensure that you put your hands correctly every time.

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